Why Companies Should Use “Fire” Over “Terminate” When Letting Employees Go

FADE IN

INT. YOUR COMPANY – AFTERNOON

EMPLOYEE

Hey, Charles, is Amber okay? I haven’t seen her around in 2 weeks.

SUPERVISOR (CHARLES)

Did she mean something to you? I never seen y’all two …

EMPLOYEE

… talk? Yeah, I mean, we never had a conversation, but she always caught my eye. I’m just curious.

SUPERVISOR

She was terminated.

EMPLOYEE

(surprisingly)

Oh my God! Seriously? By who?

SUPERVISOR

Us.

EMPLOYEE

What, what do you mean by us?

SUPERVISOR

US, the company.

EMPLOYEE

Who in the company?

SUPERVISOR

Me. Frank wanted to do it, but I had to be the one to handle it. This was personal.

EMPLOYEE

And you’re just gonna … confess to me like that?

SUPERVISOR

I terminate people all the time, man [giggles]. It’s no big deal. It’s life!

EMPLOYEE

All, all the time? What?! What did Amber do? She wouldn’t drop the box cutter?

SUPERVISOR

Too many tardies.

The employee flashbacks to last week when they was called in the office to discuss their own attendance for the past 5 weeks: tardies and absences. The words, “Start making it on time or else,” from the company’s representative, echoes in the employee’s head.

EMPLOYEE

(mumbles)

Terminate is or else?

THE NEXT DAY …

INT. YOUR COMPANY – MORNING

A car pulls up on the company’s lot, breaking the 5 MPH speed limit, double parks. Someone jumps out the car and runs into the building. It’s the employee. The supervisor waits at the clock where workers swipe their badge. 

SUPERVISOR

Well, well, well … you’re one minute late!

EMPLOYEE

(rapidly)

That turn signal light changes so fast. It was 3 cars ahead of me. ‘Bout time it was my turn it changed to red. I was sitting there for like 7 minutes.

SUPERVISOR

No more excuses! [puts hand inside jacket]

EMPLOYEE

He got a gun! [knocks out supervisor with punch]

All 42 employees in earshot of “He got a gun!” scream and run towards the exit, trampling the supervisor in the process. While the supervisor’s motionless body lies on the ground, a pink slip waving in the air falls on his face. 

FADE TO BLACK

 

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6 thoughts on “Why Companies Should Use “Fire” Over “Terminate” When Letting Employees Go”

    1. Sound so much better? Terminate means to KILL lol. That’s what this story is built on. Fire sounds more softer and friendlier in my opinion. I don’t care what those manuals say. Fired is universal. But “letting go” trumps them both.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I use “letting go”, sometimes I also use “no longer require your services” However all the paperwork I have to fill out when I let an employee go is all termed in ‘termination’ and or ‘separation’.

        Liked by 1 person

        1. “… all the paperwork I have to fill out when I let an employee go is all termed in ‘termination’ … ” Soooo you’re just gonna … confess to me like that? LOL.

          How did you find this post? Tags or the headline caught your eye?

          I consider this post a success that it reached a person who is actually responsible for the subject.

          Like

        2. I think I found it on exploring topics. Generally I check out the freshly pressed then I explore topics to what has been posted recently under blogs, humour, opinions etc. I figure that if I want to find writers worth reading I have to go out and hunt for them.

          Liked by 1 person

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